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December 2017 Archives

How to make sure your pets are taken care of after your death

When it comes to addressing the needs of a beloved pet after the death or incapacitation of the pet’s owner, Hollywood has it a bit wrong. In many movies and television shows, pet owners leave their entire estates to their furry family members, thus complicating the plot. It is true that things would get complicated if you tried to leave your fortune to your dog or cat in your will, since pets are considered property and cannot legally own an estate. However, at the law offices of Lonneman & McMahan PLLC, we know how you and other Kentucky residents can make sure your pets are cared for if you die before them.

Is Kentucky a no fault divorce state?

If you are a married Kentucky resident thinking about filing for divorce, you may be worried about how to proceed, how your children’s custody and visitation will be handled, and a myriad of other issues. You will be glad to know that, per the Legal Aid Network of Kentucky, Kentucky is a no fault divorce state. When you file for divorce, you need not claim that your spouse did anything to destroy your marriage. All you need to claim is that it is irretrievably broken.

What to include in your parenting plan

Transitioning from living with your spouse and children in one home to having your children travel back and forth between you and your ex’s space is an adjustment, but there are steps you can take to help streamline the process. One such step involves creating a parenting plan, which is essentially a written agreement between two parents that sets guidelines and determinations in any number of areas with the hope of avoiding conflict later on.

What is the difference between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13?

If you are a Kentucky resident thinking about filing for bankruptcy, you may be wondering which type of bankruptcy, Chapter 7 or Chapter 13, is right for you. As FindLaw explains, both types of bankruptcy give you debt relief, but there are substantial differences between them.

Understanding a plea bargain

Kentucky residents charged with a serious crime may be unclear as to whether or not they should allow their attorney to enter into a plea bargain with the prosecutor. The American Bar Association advises that a plea bargain is a negotiation between the prosecutor and the defendant and his or her attorney leading to an agreement as to certain things regarding the case.